.collection-53c06e22e4b0cdf4d648bed6 .page-title { color: #ea062c; }

ONE OF THE MOST CHALLENGING PARTS I FIND WHEN DEALING WITH PATIENTS IMPROVING THEIR NUTRITION IS ENSURING THEY GET ENOUGH VEGETABLE AND FRUIT SERVINGS REQUIRED TO BE HEALTHY AND FIT. IF YOU FIND IT HARD TO EAT YOUR GREENS, DRINK THEM.

Let’s face it, Doug Larson was totally on point when he said "Life expectancy would grow by leaps and bounds if green vegetables smelled as good as bacon.”

Now, I’m not here to tell you that you're probably not getting the recommended 5 servings of fruits and vegetables in your diet; the fact that you’re reading this blog already infers as much.

I'm also not here to tell you that the best way to consume fruits and vegetables is to actually eat them. You already know this, and I know you know this. And you know that I know that you know this. Weall know this. And If you didn't, now you do.

What I am here to tell you about, is a popular and less time-consuming way for you to get all those rich nutrients into your body by liquefying your fruits and vegetables. A.K.A Juicing.

People like to ask: “Hey doc, what form of juicing is better, blend or juice? “ 
And I’m like: “What’re you doing in my shower?”

So in the hopes of avoiding anymore awkward invasions of my personal space, here’s an easy breakdown of knowing the difference between blending and juicing: 

When blending:  The pulp and fiber are kept in the drink, as the fruit and vegetables are chopped up and mixed  together without any extraction.
When juicing: The machine you use will extract the pulp and fiber and leave you with just the nutrient rich liquid.
In conclusion, a blender blends. A juicer juices. It’s not rocket surgery, people

To help you decide whether to pulp or not to pulp, I've outlined some pros and cons to each method. Remember, this is not a battle of which is better but rather an observation of what will work best for you!